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« Genes, IQ and "Race Realism" | Main | Outsourcing Distraction »

December 09, 2005

Comments

dsquared

Fogel and Engerman won a Nobel prize for "proving" to their own satisfaction and that of the economics profession the exact same point about happy slaves. One of their key data points was that fear of punishment could not have been a material motivation for slaves, since each slave received an average of only 1.2 lashes per year (or some such).

Someone later pointed out that this must have meant that on the plantation they studied, an average of three slaves were flogged every week, but this received much less publicity.

Jim

Remember that this crap doesn't happen in a vacuum; the children who grow up on this crap become my neighbeors and fellow citizens. Abiola, do you remember a discussion concerning the value of public education, where you asked me how it was the business of the government to indoctrinate kids, or something along those lines? I agree in general with the opinion behind that question, but a society needs some degree of common outlook and shared assumptions to cohere enough to survive. It's fine to hold that people are free to educate their own children however they like , to include this kind of s**t, or to hold that it doesn't matter what people think, only what they do. But in reality there isn't that much distance between belief and action, and one person's right to raise his kids eventually become an encroachment on someone else's rights. I am not trying to be argumentative; I just think you might have something to say on this.

radek

"Fogel and Engerman won a Nobel prize for "proving" to their own satisfaction and that of the economics profession the exact same point about happy slaves."

Just curious, did you actually read the book or is this the standard dsquared opinion based on suspicion and distorted second hand accounts?

radek

Oh yeah, and Engerman didn't win no Nobel prize. And Fogel got it as much for railroads, navigation acts and methadology as for his work on slave productivity.

dsquared

I have read Time on the Cross and remember getting increasingly angry as I did so.

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